Sake & Wine Terroir

What is sake and wine terroir? Recaredo Cava, Cellar Credo and Sawaya Matsumoto’s ID series were shown alongside at Pidgin on September 26th to highlight the concept of terroir in all forms. 

Recaredo produces biodynamic, grand cru Cava, which express a sense of place and individualism in a category that has been dominated by bigger brands and consistency. The grand cru Serral Del Vell, for example, produces a beautifully balanced, refined and striking wine that has tremendous aging potential. Biodynamic farming practices allow for the personality of the fruit to come through, retaining natural energy in the finished wine. 

These efforts were recognized officially when Spain recently approved 12 Cava grape growing sites in a new top-level classification with the goal of promoting single-vineyard wines. 

Cellar Credo, run by the same team as Recaredo, is a biodynamic winery who aims to give Xarello a stage and show its individuality. A grape that was often seen as “lesser”, the humble Xarello offers texture, an unique savoury and complex profile that is intimately special to this variety and region. The Catalan energy truly shines through in all the wines.  

Finally, Sawaya Matsumoto is a sake brewery in Fushimi, Kyoto with a long history of protecting tradition and breaking barriers. Each of the three ID Series is made with rice from different plots of farms in the same village. These are the sake world’s answer to single-vineyard wines. 

All made with Yamadanishiki from Tojo village in Hyogo prefecture and in the same method, each cuvée expresses the uniqueness of each plot (1314-1, 39-1 and 566). For example, the 39-1 at this time has the most acidity and juiciness. They will continue to evolve over time and show it’s own character. 

For many generations, sake brewers also aimed for consistency and to be able to reproduce the same sake and style year after year. Now, the next generation of brewers are looking to express themselves through their sake. Individualism and expression of the uniqueness of the terroir has become a key theme in some of the best producers of the world, whether we are speaking of Cava, wine or sake. 

WSET Sake Level 1 in Canada!

It’s finally here! Earlier last year, WSET launched the Level 3 Award in Sake and while level 1 was available in test markets in London and the US since this summer, it’s just made it to Canada. I’m teaching it in Vancouver and Toronto in the next couple of months. If you’re in or close to either city, it’s a terrific introduction or review into the beautiful world of sake! Because it’s me, I’ll be covering food pairings with REAL food!

Details below:

Vancouver – The Art Institute of Vancouver is offering a WSET sake level 1 course for the first time in Canada, taught by Mariko Tajiri. It’s a 1-day course on Saturday, January 14th and it’s perfect for anyone who works with sake in restaurants or retail, or those who just want to learn more! Brewing basics, sake service, classifications and food pairings will all be covered.

Date: Saturday, January 14th, 2017
Time: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm
Location: The Art Institute of Vancouver
(2665 Renfrew Street
Vancouver, British Columbia)
Price: $349
Contact: Angela at 604.989.8009 or alandon@aii.edu to book your spot now.

The Art Institute also offers gift certificates for Christmas gifts and stocking stuffers…the gift of learning keeps on giving!

Toronto – This session will be taught at IWEG (Independent Wine Education Guild) and the enriched food and sake pairing component will be delivered by instructor Mariko Tajiri, providing the opportunity to experience key pairing principles through interactive tasting.    Students will have access to the Study Guide upon receipt of tuition and are required to read through the material before attending class in order to be familiar with content and participate in activities.  There will be a short break midday for refreshment. Glassware provided.

Date: Saturday, February 25th, 2017
Time: 9:30 am – 5:30 pm
Location: IWEG
(211 Yonge St. Suite 501 Toronto, Ontario)
Price: $360 **Special industry pricing available. Please enquire!
Contact: 416.534.2570

Christmas in Japan = KFC?

The holidays is a time of year when family and friends gather around – what else – food. I grew up with roast beef (my favourite) alongside big bowls of white rice and soy sauce at the dinner table on Christmas Eve. Awkward conversations, ever-so drunken uncles and aunts, everyone’s got memories of this time of year: the good, the bad and the ugly. Whatever your story may be, eating and drinking is probably a part of it.

I’ve seen holiday dinners with pierogies, cabbage rolls, sushi and my favourite, KFC. In Japan, turkeys aren’t easy to find. Turkey legs or breasts maybe, but certainly not the whole bird. In the 1970s, Kentucky Fried Chicken found a way to market the Japanese obsession with all things American during the holidays by promoting buckets of KFC fried chicken as a Christmas treat, along with a snowy-white Christmas cake.

You can pre-order these dinners, which now include a bottle of sparkling wine. Maybe it sounds strange but maybe they were onto something; maybe they were a little ahead of the times, as hipster restaurants have sprung up in some of our favourite hipster neighbourhoods around the world serving up fried chicken and grower-Champagne. Whether you’re a Juke Chicken (YVR), Church’s Chicken or KFC fan, here are a few beverages to accompany your crispy, salty drumstick or two:

Kuheiji Eau du Desir 2015 – not quite sparkling but the way this eccentric brewery pasteurizes the sake leaves a little tingle on the palate. Delicious with a salty, not so spicy fried chicken recipe.

tengumai_yamahai_jikomi_junmai

Tengumai Yamahai Junmai – brewed using the powers of natural fermentation and without adding lactic acid, this sake is salty, mouth-watering  and food-perfect. Drink slightly chilled for lots of acidity and umami. An easy pick for all things fried.

fchp03s05b_l_l

Hubert Paulet Premier Cru 2005 Rose – a grower Champagne producer who sells half their grapes to Billecart-Salmon, this elegant but nervy rose is made up of mostly Chardonnay, with a splash of Pinot Meunier. Fine bubbles with strawberries and soft herbs on the palate goes great with fried chicken knuckles at dim sum.